Nola Holt Scholarship

Honoring a Student Affairs Legend

Nola Holt royster Scholarship

Honoring a Student Affairs Legend
Holt at a Student Affairs event at the University of Arkansas.
Jazmine Griswold is one step closer to her goal of becoming a licensed speech pathologist, thanks in part to receiving the Nola Holt Royster Scholarship from the Division of Student Affairs. Griswold, a University of Arkansas graduate student, received the award last year after reading about it on the campus Newswire and sending in her application. She said it not only helped ease her financial burden, but it made her realize that she was making an important contribution on campus.

“I brought a piece of diversity to the University of Arkansas,” she said, “and winning the scholarship made me realize that even more.”

Griswold, who is majoring in Communication Disorders, said the scholarship also allowed her to volunteer in the Mentor Me program at the Children’s Therapy T.E.A.M. Clinic in Fayetteville. T.E.A.M. is the acronym for Together Everyone Accomplishes More and the clinic is the largest out-patient pediatric therapy provider in Northwest Arkansas. Griswold plans to attend graduate school when she graduates in May.

“I brought a piece of diversity to the University of Arkansas,” she said, “and winning the scholarship made me realize that even more.”
Dr. Nola Holt Royster was the director of the University’s Career Development Center and served as adjunct professor in the College of Education from 1993 until 2001. Much of her work focused on educating students, job development and employer relations, and her research studied the impact of diversity training on corporate, civic and public-sector organizations.

“She had such a heart for young people,” said her sister, Lottie Holt Shackelford, a former mayor of Little Rock and member of the Arkansas Women’s Hall of Fame. “Even as Nola was juggling the demands of working on her doctorate with those of her job as a public relations manager for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company, she still found time to work with public school students.”

What kind of student is awarded the Nola Holt Royster scholarship?

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Annually Awarded

The scholarship is awarded on an annual basis to incoming undergraduate students.
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For Arkansans

Royster had a heart for Arkansas, so the scholarship is specifically for students who attended an Arkansas high school.
!

Recipient Criteria

Scholarship recipients also demonstrate the following qualities:

  • Financial need
  • Excellence in the classroom
  • Participation in extracurricular activites
  • Contribute to the diversity of campus
J azmine Griswold is one step closer to her goal of becoming a licensed speech pathologist, thanks in part to receiving the Nola Holt Royster Scholarship from the Division of Student Affairs.
Griswold, a University of Arkansas graduate student, received the award last year after reading about it on the campus Newswire and sending in her application. She said it not only helped ease her financial burden, but it made her realize that she was making an important contribution on campus.

“I brought a piece of diversity to the University of Arkansas,” she said, “and winning the scholarship made me realize that even more.”

Griswold, who is majoring in Communication Disorders, said the scholarship also allowed her to volunteer in the Mentor Me program at the Children’s Therapy T.E.A.M. Clinic in Fayetteville. T.E.A.M. is the acronym for Together Everyone Accomplishes More and the clinic is the largest out-patient pediatric therapy provider in Northwest Arkansas. Griswold plans to attend graduate school when she graduates in May.

“I brought a piece of diversity to the University of Arkansas,” she said, “and winning the scholarship made me realize that even more.”

Jazimne Griswold

Dr. Nola Holt Royster was the director of the University’s Career Development Center and served as adjunct professor in the College of Education from 1993 until 2001. Much of her work focused on educating students, job development and employer relations, and her research studied the impact of diversity training on corporate, civic and public-sector organizations.

“She had such a heart for young people,” said her sister, Lottie Holt Shackelford, a former mayor of Little Rock and member of the Arkansas Women’s Hall of Fame. “Even as Nola was juggling the demands of working on her doctorate with those of her job as a public relations manager for Southwestern Bell Telephone Company, she still found time to work with public school students.”

Holt at a Student Affairs event at the University of Arkansas.

What kind of student is awarded the Nola Holt Royster scholarship?

!

Annually Awarded

The scholarship is awarded on an annual basis to incoming undergraduate students.
!

For Arkansans

Royster had a heart for Arkansas, so the scholarship is specifically for students who attended an Arkansas high school.
!

Recipient Criteria

Scholarship recipients also demonstrate the following qualities:

  • Financial need
  • Excellence in the classroom
  • Participation in extracurricular activites
  • Contribute to the diversity of campus
Holt Shackelford, who was ten years older than Royster, said early on she had a glimpse of her sister’s passion for young people and education.

“When she was only twelve, Nola would have her nieces and nephews perform for the family lessons that she taught or that were learned in Vacation Bible School. She was so creative—and was already helping children learn in a fun way!”

When her sister suddenly passed away in 2001, Holt Shackelford said Nola’s friends and colleagues approached her about not only setting up the scholarship as a tribute, but dedicating the Nola Holt Royster Suite at the Career Development Center to her as well. The Nola Holt Royster Memorial Scholarship is awarded annually on a competitive basis to undergraduate students who have graduated from an Arkansas high school and who will be in their final year at the university in the fall. Additional qualifications include: financial need, excellence in the classroom, campus extracurricular activities and contributes to campus diversity.

Royster and another Student Affairs professional at a Student Affairs event at the U of A.
Kemmian Johnson received the Nola Holt Royster scholarship in 2012.
“I felt that my educational and professional dreams were genuinely supported by the Career Development Center and demonstrated that the people there truly believed in my ability to succeed.”

Kemmian Johnson

P.J. Lambey received the Nola Holt Royster scholarship in 2011.
Two of Griswold’s predecessors are Kemmian Johnson and P.J. Lambey. Lambey, who received the scholarship in 2011, is a project manager for International Learning and Development for Walmart. He said he was working in the University’s career development center as a career ambassador when he got the news that he had been selected for the award.

“At the time, I was so humbled and honored to receive the scholarship,” he said. “Although I never had the privilege of knowing Dr. Royster, through my colleagues, professors and administrators, I learned of her extraordinary leadership, commitment to diversity and of the positive tone and temperament she brought to academic achievement.” Lambey said he was proud to represent her as an African-American male student and in helping to carry on her legacy.

“Receiving the Nola Holt Royster scholarship allowed me to continue to pursue by academic endeavors, plus gave me the flexibility to maintain my campus involvement,” said Kemmian Johnson, who won the scholarship in 2012. “I felt that my educational and professional dreams were genuinely supported by the Career Development Center and demonstrated that the people there truly believed in my ability to succeed.”

Johnson is currently in his third year of medical school at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Johnson is considering a residency in Internal Medicine and subspecialty in Gastroenterology.

 

Assistant Vice Chancellor for Career Services Angela Seawood Williams not only knew Royster personally, but is following in her footsteps as Executive Director of the Career Development Center.

“Nola was a mentor and friend of mine,” said Williams. “She was passionate about students’ success– inspiring many with her infectious smile and amazing words.” Williams said it was common knowledge that Dr. Royster felt that working with young people was not so much a job as a life-long passion.

“Nola was so highly thought of and successful not only at the University and in the community, but at the state and national levels too,” Holt Shackelford said.

Angela Williamson, assistant vice chancellor for Career Services, viewed Royster as a mentor in her life.

Royster served the National Conference for Community and Justice as a consultant for Workplace Diversity training, where clients cross all sectors of the community including police departments, school districts, municipalities, chambers of commerce, government, business and industry. Her civic affiliations included responsibilities as the Arkansas Collegiate Coordinator of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc., United Way of Washington County Board of Directors, NCCJ Board and the Fayetteville Rotary, while serving as past president of the Arkansas Council for Women in Higher Education. She was a member of the American Association for Pupil Personnel, American College Placement Council, the Southwest Association of Colleges and Employers and the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators.

“There’s not a day that goes by that someone doesn’t comes up to me and tell me something that Nola helped them achieve,” said Holt-Shackelford. “Her life had an extraordinary impact on so many people. She was a very humble, sharing person and I know she would be elated about this scholarship,” she said. “Because sometimes a scholarship like this can make all the difference in the world to students in helping them complete their education.”

Do you want to give to student leadership?

Learn more about how your gifts can help support students like the Nola Holt Scholarship awardees at the University of Arkansas. For more information about giving to Student Affairs, go to studentaffairs.uark.edu.